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As a woman who went to a mixed comprehensive on the South Coast of England I can’t exactly say this tale of Scottish Catholic school girls resonated with me, but I still enjoyed the experience; the novelty of a female-dominated (both its cast and director) play, the music of ELO (you have no soul if you don’t bounce in your seat to Mr Blue Sky) and the delightful coming of age story and all the issues that come with that, will win even the most cynical audience over.

I am not sure why I like theatre so much. It can’t be about the shared experience because I am not a huge cinema fan, and no, theatre audiences aren’t more behaved than cinemas audiences! So that leaves the aspect of live art- a feeling that despite all the rehearsals, all the preparation it could all go wrong on the night.

Our latest  #WhenIWas18 Q&A features Mykal Rand Resident Director/Choreographer and alternate Big Moe/Nomax from Five Guys Named Moe.

Enter into the Wyndham’s theatre and you will be transported back to 1959 South Philadelphia. On the front of the stalls and the sides of the stage are cabaret tables for the audience to sit back in and soak up the atmosphere of this small, run down bar. And why are we all gathered in this dive? Because the act about to take the stage is the legendary Billie Holiday in Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill

It seems extraordinary that Jim Steinman's rock album, Bat Out of Hell, made famous by Meatloaf (already musical royalty through his association with Rocky Horror Show) hasn't been a West End musical before now. Following the demise of We Will Rock You, London's rock-musical fans have been crying out for an epic and goodness, this certainly fills that need!

The Wind in the Willows, playing this Summer at the spectacular London Palladium, is a fun, albeit slightly over-the-top musical based on Kenneth Grahame's well-loved novel. The adaptation was written by Julian Fellowes (Downton Abbey), with music by Stiles and Drewe (Half a Sixpence). But, whilst the show is visually impressive and full of catchy tunes, it feels quite laboured at times.

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